How To Build A Shipping Container Home With A Small Budget Blog Cover

How To Build A Shipping Container Home With A Small Budget

Posted By: February 1, 2016 In Featured

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One of the most common reasons why people want to build a shipping container home is because they can be built very cheaply.

In a recent blog post we discussed the cheapest shipping container homes ever built- and some were built for less than $30,000!

However, this isn’t to say that the price is the only reason to be living in a shipping container home. There are lots of reasons why you should live in a container home and for many it is due to recycling unused materials and being environmentally-conscious.

To build a shipping container home on a tight budget, you need to be savvy and know exactly where you can skimp and save money- but also, where you need to spend your money to get the best results.

Want to learn how to be savvy and save your money? Keep reading…

Plan, Plan and Plan

Budgeting and Planning Shipping Container HomeIf you want to build a container home whilst on a tight budget, the first thing you need to do is plan– and plan well.

If you don’t have your plan well mapped out then how are you going to know if you are doing well or not throughout your build?

You won’t.

You will be improvising throughout the building process hoping for the best. This is no way to build a home and you will likely run into serious problems along the way.

There are two key elements to planning.

The first is to plan your budget. Decide how much money you have to spend on building your home new.

The second is to decide exactly what it is you want to build. How many bedrooms will your home have? How many stories will it have? Will you be building with new or used shipping containers?

Only with a thorough plan can you hope to build your container home on a tight budget.

Don’t Make Silly Mistakes

The easiest way to lose money when building your new home is to make silly mistakes.

The most common mistake I see with container homes is removing too much steel out of the containers when modifying them.

You know why people remove too much steel?

Because, they haven’t planned properly and don’t know exactly what they want their container home to look- so instead they experiment and end up cutting too much steel away.

There is nothing worse than wasting materials which you’ve already paid for- especially when you’re on a small budget.

I can still remember having to rebuild the fireplace when I built my first home- it cost me several thousand dollars and I still get upset thinking about it now!

If I planned properly and wasn’t rushing, I’m sure I would have avoided that mistake and saved my money…

Make sure you read 5 mistakes to avoid when building a shipping container home.

Which Are the Cheapest Containers to Build With?

Which Are the Cheapest Containers to Build With

One of the largest expenses when building a shipping container home is actually purchasing the shipping containers.

Choosing the right containers is absolutely crucial to both your budget and the success of your project.

The first decision you need to make is whether to buy new or used shipping containers.

Now, there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to which type to buy- however I can give you some good reference points to think about.

Firstly, I’d only buy used shipping containers if I could see them before I purchased them. I know quite a few people who have purchased used containers without seeing them first and the containers were really beat up when they arrived!

Not the best start to a home build is it…

Also, whichever type of container you buy (new or used) make sure that they are all the same brand. Manufactures use slightly different measurement tolerances when making the containers, so building with different brand containers can sometimes be difficult.

Personally, I find the most cost effective containers are ‘one-trips’. One-trip containers are shipping containers which have only been used once for haulage- they aren’t used sea-beaten containers which have spent years at sea!

If you want more help when choosing your shipping containers make sure you read which shipping container should I buy?

Choosing Where to Spend Your Money

A great way to help reduce the build cost of your home is to spend most of your money on the things that can’t be altered and skimp on what can be altered later on.

Know Where to Save MoneyLet me give you a few examples of how this can be achieved.

I would purchase the very best shipping containers that I can afford and I wouldn’t skimp here- you can’t replace or change the containers once you have built your house.

Whereas, I would skimp when choosing my kitchen fixings, carpet or paint. This is because each of these things can be changed quite easily once you’ve moved in.

Another great way to save money is to use building materials which require low maintenance. A great example of this is using a metal roof- they require very little upkeep once they have been fitted.

A final word of warning though: don’t try to save money on the structural components!

Yes you want to build an affordable home- but you also want a home which is safe to live in.

Track Every Dollar Spent

And when I say every dollar- I mean every last one of them!

When I built my first home- money was flying out my bank account from all directions. And very quickly I was running out of money before I’d really got going.

With additional costs thrown in by the contractor for a misunderstanding and a last minute kitchen upgrade I was left trying to save every cent for the last few months of the build.

As I’ve said above- make a plan, but also stick to it and track every dollar spent in a spreadsheet to make sure you are on budget.

There is no sense in having a plan and not tracking what’s actually being spent against your planned expenses.

You can guarantee there will be unexpected costs and things that surprise you- but if you plan sensibly and stick to the plan, you will be able to build a very cheap home for yourself.

Salvage Local Materials

Salvage Shipping ContainersThe last tip I’m going to share with you today is to try and use salvaged materials.

You’d be amazed at the things people give away for free!

As they say “one man’s trash, is another’s treasure”.

I find the best place to collect salvaged materials from is demolition sites. Most of the time you can get the materials for free providing you transport the materials yourself.

Even if they do want money for the materials it’s usually a nominal fee.

Just so nobody gets into trouble- make sure you ask the owner first, don’t just assume that you can take the salvaged materials!


Choosing to build your home out of shipping containers can be a great way to save money.

We have seen plenty of container homes built for less than $50,000.

If you have a tight budget when building your container home, make sure to plan everything thoroughly beforehand. This way you won’t run into any unforeseen issues during the build!

Once you’ve planned make sure you keep to this plan and track each dollar you spend against your budget.

To save money you can purchase one-trip containers which are normally a few thousand dollars cheaper than new containers but offer the same benefits.

Also, you can visit local salvage sites to reclaim unused building materials to save even more money.

Got any other great ideas for how to keep your cost down when building a container home? Let us know in the comments below…

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  1. Ivan

    Tom, I’m taking your advice and beginning with a plan. How I insulate will affect the overall design….form follows function I guess. I really love the look of the raw container. Something like the container of Hope by Garcia. If I use spray foam insulation on the inside, will the roof hold up to the elements or do you recommend building a secondary roof on top of the container to both add some slope and to add longevity to the container?

    • Tom

      Hi Ivan,

      You can just spray foam the inside and not add an additional roof, but this isn’t the route I’d go down.

      I would definitely recommend building a ‘secondary’ roof.


  2. Handzie galllant

    I was wondering what about using metal studs instead of wood to frame out the home…be cause I don’t want to have to deal with termites later down the road.

    • Tom

      Hi Handzie,

      Yes you can certainly use metal studs instead- the only thing is they tend to cost a bit more money than wood…


  3. Shrinath Rao

    Hi Tom,
    I was wondering if the cost you mentioned of $ 50,000 for a home. What was the Square footage of the house. Did it include the cost of land [If so, how much?]. Do all states allow this kind of construction? Does the cost include, all the permits and licenses, registration and the like. I am very much interested in building, at $ 50,000, if the square footage is 1280 with a small yard and a 1 car garage – I would be very happy. My state is Michigan.
    Thanks and Best Regards,

    • Tom

      Hi Rao,

      The home was 1,075 square foot and the total figure did not include the cost of the land.

      It really depends on the state where you live and their local zoning laws- however container homes are becoming much more popular now which is with building permit approvals.

      Hope this helps,


  4. Ali

    I love this project but i have no idea about all the component of this project and how can i paint it. I would love to know every thing about it

    • Tom

      Hi Ali,

      Thank you for getting in touch.

      We have just published an article called ‘getting started’ and I think this will really help you. Give it a read and let me know if you have any questions,


  5. Emma Prollamante

    Love love the idea of Container home and thank you for all the info you’ve posted. I own a lot in a gated resort like property in Dubois, PA, and thinking of having this kind of a home for my retirement in a couple of years. Would you know if anyone has done such a job in that area? Can you recommend?

    • Tom

      Hi Emma,

      Thanks for getting in touch!

      I’m not particularly familiar with that area, but if you send me an email, I will see if I can find some more information for you.


  6. Steve

    Eh Tom, I’m thinking of making our new home out of shipping containers and I want to do the work my self.
    How do you fix the containers together and fix the studded walls inside to the container.



    • Tom

      Hi Steve,

      To connect the containers together you can either weld them or bolt them together. Welding is by far the most common, however if you are planning on moving the containers in time to come then bolting if much more flexible.

      If you’re looking for me detail We cover this with dedicated chapters within our guide.

      Many Thanks,


  7. Jax

    I just purchased some land in the high desert of calif and these tips are gold. The insulation tip was a ” I had no idea,” moment. I’m planning on getting 3 containers to place on my land. I’m taking my time in looking for the right containers due to the extreme heat and high winds. Is the foundation standard? Oh there are no special permits required.

    • Tom

      Hi Jax,

      I’m glad the tips are helping you and getting you on your way.

      Yes, you can just use standard concrete piers for foundations; the only difference would be you should incorporate steel plates on the pads to weld the containers to.


  8. Shanda Salamaca

    Hi, I just came across your website and am new to the shipping container home concept. I’m curious about the pricing. How much square feet can you get for 50,000.00?

    • Tom

      Hi Shanda,

      It really depends on the design and what you want the final version to look like. However it should be around 1,000 square feet as a very rough rule of thumb.


  9. stivard

    I have started planning my first container home but How do i fix the studs for the inner wallson to the container?

    • Tom

      Hi Stivard,

      You can use self-tapping screws to fit head and sole plates to the containers. Then just use battens to frame out your container.


  10. Riaan

    Hi, I have read wonderful things about container homes. I live in Karoo in South Africa where summer temperature gets in the high forty degree celcius and was wondering if containers could be used here. Could insulating the walls and roof be enough to combat the exterior metal heat?

    And another question, normal homes that are build with bricks and cement do not rust, will this not be a problem with containers?

    • Tom

      Hi Riaan,

      Thank you for getting in touch.

      If you use the correct insulation type and enough of it then yes it will be enough to combat the exterior heat.

      Also with regards to the rust, if you maintain the containers properly then rust will not be a problem.


  11. Kilee

    Hi there,

    What recommendations can you give on finding an architect and contractor to work with?

    Thank you,


    • Tom

      Hi Kilee,

      We are currently working to compile a list of contractors to add to our resources section however at the moment this isn’t complete.

      However in the mean time the best thing I suggest you do is visit my blog post on ‘what I wish I knew’- within it we mention several major contractors.

      This will help get you started,